Flexible recovery of overpayments, emergency salary advances and priority payments

From Public Services and Procurement Canada

This page provides information on the flexible recovery of overpayments, emergency salary advances and priority payments.

Flexible recovery of overpayments, emergency salary advances and priority payments

In order to relieve the financial stress and hardships of employees experiencing overpayments in Phoenix, the government has made changes to the Directive on Terms and Conditions of Employment. These changes will help employees by providing significantly more flexibility for the recovery of overpayments, emergency salary advances and priority payments. 

Unless employees choose to pay the amounts owing right away, recoveries of these amounts will only start when:

The following questions and answers provide further information and clarifications on this initiative.

Questions and answers

Scope of application

Question 1: To what types of overpayments do these flexibilities apply?

These flexibilities cover overpayments, emergency salary advances and priority payments received by employees due to issues arising as a direct result of Phoenix.

They do not apply to recoveries of amounts owing arising from routine pay transactions, which include, but are not limited to, the following:

  • overpayments of less than 10% of an employee’s gross bi-weekly pay
  • periods of leave without pay of 5 days or less submitted in the current pay period
  • overpayments resulting from employees inputting leave without pay for periods that were already paid
  • overdrawn leave (vacation/sick) upon termination of employment (for reasons other than incapacity/illness and layoff)
  • cancellation of a leave with income averaging agreement by the employee, where the leave has been taken
  • amounts advanced on behalf of employees for union dues
  • maternity/parental allowance, where the employee has not fulfilled their obligation as set out in their collective agreement or terms and conditions of employment
  • amounts owed to public service health insurance plans, pension, supplementary death benefit or disability/long-term disability due to periods of leave without pay
Question 2: Will these flexibilities apply to employees leaving the public service?

The new flexibilities do not change the management of recoveries associated with termination of employment, end-of-term or casual contracts without further extension or renewal.

Question 3: I am leaving the public service shortly and have been told I have an amount owing, how do I repay?

With respect to former employees, recovery will depend upon the reason for termination.

Retirement

Employees who retire from the public service will have any outstanding amounts owing transferred to the Public Service Pension Centre to be recovered from their pension entitlement. The Public Service Pension Centre’s default recovery plan is 10% of the gross monthly pension amount. Employees experiencing hardship will need to advise the Public Service Pension Centre of these issues and work out a more accommodating recovery plan.

Other

Employees whose employment ends due to an end in contract or resignation will have any amounts owing recovered in full from first available funds, as per the Terms and Conditions of Employment.

A letter will be sent to the former employee requesting payment of the amount owing and providing details as to how to submit payment and the ramifications of not paying within the allotted period of time.

If the former employee’s department is not serviced by the Public Service Pay Centre, they should follow their departmental procedures.

Question 4: Are students entitled to these same flexibilities?

No, however human resources or compensation advisors are asked to work with students in order to devise a repayment plan that is reasonable.

Commencement of recoveries

Question 5: When will I have overpayments deducted from my pay?

You will only have overpayments recovered:

  • once all transactions on your file have been completed
  • you receive 3 consecutive payments without issue
  • you have a recovery agreement in place

You may delay repayments until you receive monies owed, such as income tax refunds or retroactive payments from the implementation of their most recent collective agreements.

Question 6: Why wait for 3 pay periods prior to having a recovery commence?

Delaying recoveries until employees have received payments for 3 consecutive pay periods ensures that the employees’ pay has stabilized prior to recovery.

Question 7: Why are emergency salary advances and priority payments no longer being recovered from first available funds?

As a result of the Government’s changes to the Directive on Terms and Conditions of Employment, emergency salary advances and priority payments are no longer considered advances pursuant to the Accountable Advance Regulations. Rather, these payments are for services rendered for which employees have not yet been compensated. To ensure that all recoveries are managed on a consistent basis, recovery of these payments is to be handled in a similar manner as for salary overpayments.

Question 8: If I am off on extended leave without pay (that is, 6 days or more), how long will recovery of the amounts owed be delayed?

If you are off on an extended period of leave without pay, repayment of any amounts owed will not take place until you have returned to work, all the transactions on your pay file have been completed, you have received payments for 3 consecutive pay periods without issue, and you have a recovery agreement in place. However, depending on the length of the period of leave without pay, you may be required to acknowledge the overpayment in a letter sent by the Public Service Pay Centre.

Management of recoveries

Question 9: Who is responsible for informing employees of their overpayments? How will this be done? What if there are questions regarding the legitimacy of the overpayment?

The Public Service Pay Centre will provide employees with a letter advising them that there is an amount owing on their account (for example, an overpayment, emergency salary advance or priority payment). The letter will provide details on the cause of the overpayment and inform them that no amount will be recovered until all transactions on their pay file are processed. It will also indicate how employees can make an early repayment, if they wish.

Once all transactions on their account are processed and they have received 3 consecutive correct pays, a recovery plan will be established with the employee.

If you have any questions as to whether an overpayment is legitimate, you should communicate with the Public Service Pay Centre at 1-855-686-4729 or complete a Phoenix feedback form.

For departments that are not served by the Public Service Pay Centre, recoveries will be coordinated through departmental compensation advisors.

Question 10: What steps should an employee take if they have an overpayment, priority payment or emergency salary advance recovered from their pay cheque without being informed?

If you notice that a recovery of your overpayment is not done in accordance with these flexibilities, you should contact the Public Service Pay Centre at 1-855-686-4729 or complete a Phoenix feedback form.

Note: Use Track myCASE (accessible only on the Government of Canada network) to view status of pay-related cases with the Public Service Pay Centre. The case data is updated daily.

If your organization is not served by the Public Service Pay Centre, you should follow your organization’s procedures.

Question 11: How much flexibility will I have to determine my repayment schedule?

You will be provided all reasonable flexibility with respect to the repayment timeframe and the rate to be paid. The default rate of recovery for amounts owing is 10% of an employee’s bi-weekly pay, but you will have the option to select a lower repayment rate.

In general, repayment should be completed within 3 years of a plan being established, or earlier for employees departing the government. A repayment period in excess of 3 years may be considered where required, in cases of repayment plans that are below 10% of pay.

Question 12: If I have a recovery plan already in place, can I change it based on these new flexibilities?

If you are experiencing financial hardship, but have already agreed to a recovery plan before these current measures were put in place, you can have your recovery plan modified in order to benefit from these new measures.

To change your recovery plan, you should contact the Public Service Pay Centre at 1-855-686-4729 or complete a Phoenix feedback form.

Note: Use Track myCASE (accessible only on the Government of Canada network) to view the status of pay-related cases with the Public Service Pay Centre.  The case data is updated daily. If your department/agency is not serviced by the Public Service Pay Centre, follow your departmental procedures.

If your organization is not serviced by the Public Service Pay Centre, you should follow your organization’s procedures.

Question 13: What could a sample recovery plan for an employee look like?

In the scenario provided below, the employee is in an AS-03 position and is paid a gross salary of $2,371.00 every 2 weeks. The overpayment amount due to pay system issues is $5,000.00 and the employee has agreed to a recovery plan of 10% of their gross pay. It will take 22 pays to recover the overpayment.

Note: If the gross pay changes, the recovered amount will not be changed unless requested by the employee.

Number of payments Bi-weekly gross pay Overpayment recovered (10% of gross pay) Overpayment balance
- - - $5,000.00
1 $2,371.86 $237.19 $4,762.81
2 $2,371.86 $237.19 $4,525.63
3 $2,371.86 $237.19 $4,288.44
4 $2,371.86 $237.19 $4,051.26
5 $2,371.86 $237.19 $3,814.07
6 $2,371.86 $237.19 $3,576.88
7 $2,371.86 $237.19 $3,339.70
8 $2,371.86 $237.19 $3,102.51
9 $2,371.86 $237.19 $2,865.33
10 $2,371.86 $237.19 $2,628.14
11 $2,371.86 $237.19 $2,390.95
12 $2,371.86 $237.19 $2,153.77
13 $2,371.86 $237.19 $1,916.58
14 $2,371.86 $237.19 $1,679.40
15 $2,371.86 $237.19 $1,442.21
16 $2,371.86 $237.19 $1,205.02
17 $2,371.86 $237.19 $967.84
18 $2,371.86 $237.19 $730.65
19 $2,371.86 $237.19 $493.47
20 $2,371.86 $237.19 $256.28
21 $2,371.86 $237.19 $19.09
22 $2,371.86 $19.09 -

Other

Question 14: Who has the authority to approve a modified recovery plan?

For departments served by the Public Service Pay Centre, compensation advisors at the Public Service Pay Centre will have the authority to approve recovery plans. For departments that are not served by the Public Service Pay Centre, the departmental compensation advisor or other designated departmental personnel will have authority.

Question 15: Will I have overpayments recovered from amounts I may be owed outside of regular salary (for example, revision amounts due to signing of a collective agreement)?

No, amounts will be recovered from your regular salary unless you request amounts be to recovered from other lump-sum amounts that you may be owed.

If you wish to have overpayments recovered from pending amounts owed, or if you would like to repay any amounts owing through other means, you should communicate with the Public Service Pay Centre at 1‑855-686-4729 or complete a Phoenix feedback form.

Note: Use Track myCASE (accessible only on the Government of Canada network) to view the status of pay-related cases with the Public Service Pay Centre. The case data is updated daily.

If the employee’s department is not served by the Public Service Pay Centre, you should follow your organization’s procedures.

Question 16: How will my overpayment from a previous year be treated if it is recovered in another year?

Due to income tax regulations, employees who have an overpayment from a previous year will have to pay the gross amount of the monies owed. The employee must repay the gross overpayment since the Government of Canada has already provided the tax withholdings (for example, income tax withheld from wages) to the Canada Revenue Agency (CRA) on behalf of the employee. Only the earnings are adjusted on the tax slips. The CRA is not currently in a position to reimburse the employer as the law requires they repay the amount to the individual.

Question 17: Will there be a write-off of amounts owed?

There will be no write-offs of amounts owing.

Question 18: Who should employees contact once they have established a retirement date to ensure their pay is stopped on time (in order to prevent an overpayment situation)?

The first point of contact is an employee’s immediate supervisor who will initiate the process and necessary paperwork. The employee will be required to submit a formal letter indicating their intention to retire. If employed by a department/agency that is not served by the Public Service Pay Centre, necessary paperwork will be sent to their departmental human resources team for action. If employed with a department/agency that is served by the Public Service Pay Centre, the necessary paperwork (including pay action request form) will be sent to the Public Service Pay Centre for action.

Retirees

Question 19: What should I do if I received an overpayment while I was working that has not been recovered, but I have since retired from the public service?

If you were subject to an overpayment prior to your departure, and you don’t already have a repayment agreement in place, you will receive a letter to inform you of the overpayment, as well as instructions and options for recovery. The letter will be sent from either your departmental human resources team (if you were formerly employed with a department/agency that is not served by the Public Service Pay Centre) or from the Public Service Pay Centre (if you were formerly employed with a department/agency that is served by the Public Service Pay Centre).

Former employees should contact either their former supervisor or departmental human resources team (if formerly employed with a department/agency that is not served by the Public Service Pay Centre) or the Public Service Pay Centre (if you were formerly employed with a department/agency that is served by the Public Service Pay Centre).

Question 20: Who do I contact if I have retired from the public service but continue to receive my regular pay? How will the overpayment be recovered?

If you have retired from the public service, but continue to receive pay, you should immediately contact either your former supervisor or departmental human resources team (if you were formerly employed with a department or agency that is not served by the Public Service Pay Centre) or the Public Service Pay Centre (if you were formerly employed with a department or agency that is served by the Public Service Pay Centre).

Once your pay file has been reconciled, you will receive a letter from the Public Service Pension Centre indicating the overpayment amount and instructions and options for recovery. Generally, employees who retire from the public service will have the overpayment recovered from their pension entitlement. The Public Service Pension Centre’s default recovery plan is 10% of the gross monthly pension amount. If you are experiencing hardship, you will need to advise the Public Service Pension Centre of these issues and work out a more accommodating recovery plan.

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